Forever, Always, and Today

Liberal, pro-choice, pro-marriage equality, secular, outspoken feminist.

Also very much in love with Doctor Who, Sherlock, Harry Potter, Supernatural, Merlin, Teen Wolf, Elementary, etc.
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straightwhiteboysanonymous:

Can we signal boost this creep?

If there is anything identifying about him on his profile, you could report him to his superior officers and get him in a shit ton of trouble.

(via okcreepsters)

jojen appreciation week: day 3 - favourite trait(s)
"Bran wondered why they all listened to Jojen so much. He was not a prince like Bran, nor big and strong like Hodor, nor as good a hunter as Meera, yet somehow it was always Jojen telling them what to do. "

(via icoulduseinsouciantmaybe)

I either have to stop watching Netflix on my lunch, or I need to invest in a mobile hotspot. Neither of which I want to do.

So anyway, I was having this argument with my father about Martin Luther King and how his message was too conservative compared to Malcolm X’s message. My father got really angry at me. It wasn’t that he disliked Malcolm X, but his point was that Malcolm X hadn’t accomplished anything as Dr. King had.

I was kind of sarcastic and asked something like, so what did Martin Luther King accomplish other than giving his “I have a dream speech.”

Before I tell you what my father told me, I want to digress. Because at this point in our amnesiac national existence, my question pretty much reflects the national civic religion view of what Dr. King accomplished. He gave this great speech. Or some people say, “he marched.” I was so angry at Mrs. Clinton during the primaries when she said that Dr. King marched, but it was LBJ who delivered the Civil Rights Act.

At this point, I would like to remind everyone exactly what Martin Luther King did, and it wasn’t that he “marched” or gave a great speech.

My father told me with a sort of cold fury, “Dr. King ended the terror of living in the south.”

Please let this sink in and and take my word and the word of my late father on this. If you are a white person who has always lived in the U.S. and never under a brutal dictatorship, you probably don’t know what my father was talking about.

But this is what the great Dr. Martin Luther King accomplished. Not that he marched, nor that he gave speeches.

He ended the terror of living as a black person, especially in the south.

I’m guessing that most of you, especially those having come fresh from seeing The Help, may not understand what this was all about. But living in the south (and in parts of the midwest and in many ghettos of the north) was living under terrorism.

It wasn’t that black people had to use a separate drinking fountain or couldn’t sit at lunch counters, or had to sit in the back of the bus.

You really must disabuse yourself of this idea. Lunch counters and buses were crucial symbolic planes of struggle that the civil rights movement used to dramatize the issue, but the main suffering in the south did not come from our inability to drink from the same fountain, ride in the front of the bus or eat lunch at Woolworth’s.

It was that white people, mostly white men, occasionally went berserk, and grabbed random black people, usually men, and lynched them. You all know about lynching. But you may forget or not know that white people also randomly beat black people, and the black people could not fight back, for fear of even worse punishment.

This constant low level dread of atavistic violence is what kept the system running. It made life miserable, stressful and terrifying for black people.

White people also occasionally tried black people, especially black men, for crimes for which they could not conceivably be guilty. With the willing participation of white women, they often accused black men of “assault,” which could be anything from rape to not taking off one’s hat, to “reckless eyeballing.”

This is going to sound awful and perhaps a stain on my late father’s memory, but when I was little, before the civil rights movement, my father taught me many, many humiliating practices in order to prevent the random, terroristic, berserk behavior of white people. The one I remember most is that when walking down the street in New York City side by side, hand in hand with my hero-father, if a white woman approached on the same sidewalk, I was to take off my hat and walk behind my father, because he had been taught in the south that black males for some reason were supposed to walk single file in the presence of any white lady.

This was just one of many humiliating practices we were taught to prevent white people from going berserk.

I remember a huge family reunion one August with my aunts and uncles and cousins gathered around my grandparents’ vast breakfast table laden with food from the farm, and the state troopers drove up to the house with a car full of rifles and shotguns, and everyone went kind of weirdly blank. They put on the masks that black people used back then to not provoke white berserkness. My strong, valiant, self-educated, articulate uncles, whom I adored, became shuffling, Step-N-Fetchits to avoid provoking the white men. Fortunately the troopers were only looking for an escaped convict. Afterward, the women, my aunts, were furious at the humiliating performance of the men, and said so, something that even a child could understand.

This is the climate of fear that Dr. King ended.

If you didn’t get taught such things, let alone experience them, I caution you against invoking the memory of Dr. King as though he belongs exclusively to you and not primarily to African Americans.

The question is, how did Dr. King do this—and of course, he didn’t do it alone.

(Of all the other civil rights leaders who helped Dr. King end this reign of terror, I think the most under appreciated is James Farmer, who founded the Congress of Racial Equality and was a leader of nonviolent resistance, and taught the practices of nonviolent resistance.)

So what did they do?

They told us: Whatever you are most afraid of doing vis-a-vis white people, go do it. Go ahead down to city hall and try to register to vote, even if they say no, even if they take your name down.

Go ahead sit at that lunch counter. Sue the local school board. All things that most black people would have said back then, without exaggeration, were stark raving insane and would get you killed.

If we do it all together, we’ll be okay.

They made black people experience the worst of the worst, collectively, that white people could dish out, and discover that it wasn’t that bad. They taught black people how to take a beating—from the southern cops, from police dogs, from fire department hoses. They actually coached young people how to crouch, cover their heads with their arms and take the beating. They taught people how to go to jail, which terrified most decent people.

And you know what? The worst of the worst, wasn’t that bad.

Once people had been beaten, had dogs sicced on them, had fire hoses sprayed on them, and been thrown in jail, you know what happened?

These magnificent young black people began singing freedom songs in jail.

That, my friends, is what ended the terrorism of the south. Confronting your worst fears, living through it, and breaking out in a deep throated freedom song. The jailers knew they had lost when they beat the crap out of these young Negroes and the jailed, beaten young people began to sing joyously, first in one town then in another. This is what the writer, James Baldwin, captured like no other writer of the era.

Please let this sink in. It wasn’t marches or speeches. It was taking a severe beating, surviving and realizing that our fears were mostly illusory and that we were free.

Daily Kos :: Most of you have no idea what Martin Luther King actually did 

Reblogging this so I can come back to it in the spring when I teach the Civil Rights Movement to my 5th graders. 

(via copperoranges)

Reblogging this for all the non-black people who like to quote MLK like he’s theirs.

(via heathenist)

(via teaandfeminism)

sassygayharpist:

hughdancydance:

femininewritings:

fkef:

king-of-aces:

thickienicki:

kobetyrant:

Britney is younger than Bey…

white people age like milk lol

Lmao

yeah. the stress of having your parents financially dependent on you since childhood, learning disabilities, mental illness, two divorces, and drug and alcohol abuse will age you. 

not to say bey has had it easier since you know, racism. but bey definitely has class privilege and as far as we know, health/ability privilege over britney. but yeah, go on and say how poorly britney has aged. It’s not like she’s been working and paying her family’s bills since she was like 15.

I have to agree on this…it’s not fair to make racial comments about one woman in comparison to another. As women, we need to be trying to cooperate with each other, not tear each other down. It only perpetuates an endless damaging cycle, in my humble opinion.

Not to mention the fact that Beyonce, the woman who stood in front of the word Feminist in big letters on national television, probably would be really upset to see that people are saying things like this. 

Also 

image

She looks just fine to me. 

YES pitting women against each other does nothing to help anyone

(via randomfandomteacher)

millennialau:

Rev Sekou kneeled between protesters and police and prayed, then was thrown into a police vehicle with blood smears all inside of it.

(via stretchmarxism)

tofuttiqt:

stephenhawqueen:

the US is unreal like girls cant wear shorts to school, you can literally lose your job for being gay, and unarmed black children are brutally murdered on the regular but white ppl r still like “what a beautiful country. i can freely carry a gun for no reason and some of our mountains look like presidents. god bless”

Without acknowledging that those white faces are on Indigenous land and the government desecrated a sacred place.

(via randomfandomteacher)

whitepeoplestealingculture:

hongkongstrikenow:

reblog or upload it anywhere you want

spread the word

IT IS TRUE. 

Here is an article explaining it as well.

Please amplify their voices, please pay attention.

(via thisisnotchina)

iwriteaboutfeminism:

The overwhelming injustice of John Crawford’s murder. 

(via absentlyabbie)

doodlesanddiscord:

thommquackenbush:

jennlyons:

jadelyn:

Are you fucking kidding me? Like, no, Shakespeare wouldn’t tweet a sonnet cause 140 characters is a bit short for that. Wrong medium. But you know what he would have? A very active twitter FULL OF DICK PUNS AND YOUR MOM JOKES okay. (And probably also a blog for the sonnets and longer works, that cross-posts links to twitter anyway.)

Get out of here with that pretentious anti-technology bullshit.

He’d rock the fuck out of memes. Don’t deny it.

Exit, pursued by a doge.

much run wow 

I don’t understand people who try to make Shakespeare into a pretentious thing cause he was basically an uneducated dick-joke making dude for the common masses. His historical plays are straight up fanfiction. There’s a scene in Macbeth where two guards are having a conversation as a dude pees on a wall. Get out of here with your Shakespeare snobbery.

(via elementalwolf)

As much as I love the Hardison/Parker/Eliot pairing (tripling or whatever), I do very much enjoy Eliot interacting with Mikel, the female hitter in the episode The Two Live Crew Job.

saucefactory:

brevityandeloquence:

Fancast: Aldis Hodge as Tony Stark

#oh my goddddddd #i’m automatically a million times more interested in rich kind of dickish superheroes when they are poc tbh #because like imagine being a little black boy growing up so so so smart and so so so alone #half your teachers dismissing you when you get bored and restless because you already KNOW all this stuff #and focusing on your disruptive behaviour that results from that combination of boredom and loneliness #you grow up without any real peers because the other kids at your rich fancy private school are all white #and nobody would ever dare say anything but you’re self-conscious anyway #so you deal with it by being as outrageous as possible because then at least you can control why they look at you askance #your dad’s been trying to prove himself to long gone heroes for as long as you can remember #and your mother loves you but she doesn’t always understand you #they die young and you go off the rails and it doesn’t even sting that they all think you’ve proven them right #because you kind of believe it as well #you’ve grown up never seeing a black boy on the television who wasn’t violent #and even when you get straightened out some with help from rhodey there’s a long fucking way to go #but you reach out and you /demand/ respect because you’re angry and you want justice for all your wrongs #the media never really accept you; they’re hungry for more of your misadventures so they can paint you like a villain (via peppermoonchilds)

I NEED THIS SO BADLY I’M CRYING.

(via absentlyabbie)

ccushty:

punkgender:

one of the worst things about becoming educated on social issues is when people are like ‘you used to have a sense of humor’

no i used to have internalized prejudices which i’ve worked really hard to overcome and i realize now that your jokes are shitty

Always reblog this because becoming more socially aware makes you dislike a lot of people

(via redmiel)

facedownunderthemoss:

haiweewicci:

lastrealindians:

86 years ago today (1927) Gutzon Borglum began defacing the sacred BlackHills with Mt. Rushmore.

Everyone must remember that “Mt. Rushmore” (the Black Hills) does not legally belong to the federal government, and especially not to South Dakota.  It was acknowledged as belonging to the sovereign Lakota Nation in the Sioux Treaty of 1868.  The federal government STOLE the Hills from the Lakota, breaking the law they wrote with their own hands!  The US is a repeat criminal but no one holds them accountable!

never fucking forget.

(via whogivesacrapwhatmyusernameis)